FIO NEWS

FIO Coronavirus Vessel & Lab Update (PDF)

Coronavirus Update (PDF)

FIO State University Subsidized Shiptime Request for Proposals

St. Pete Science Festival 2020 – Oct 17

Florida Institute of Oceanography

For more than four decades, the Florida Institute of Oceanography has unified marine science interests across Florida in the cause of understanding and stewardship of the coastal oceans. FIO is taking a leading national role in the scientific assessment of the impact of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Florida is a state whose history, economy and culture are intertwined with the waters that surround it. Recognizing the need to protect and understand this central force and shared heritage, 20 institutions and agencies from across the state work collaboratively through FIO to maximize marine research and education resources. FIO’s goal is to provide a forum for addressing the challenges facing our oceans and develop strategies for civic engagement, natural resource management and public policy which preserves and protects ocean resources. The Earth system is changing and the future will require an educated and informed populace and a new generation of ocean scientists, engineers, and policy leaders to maintain a productive and sustainable environment. FIO aims to transform Florida’s scientific capabilities in ocean research while providing the education and marine management skills needed to protect our treasured marine environment.
Florida Institute of Oceanography
Florida Institute of Oceanography
Join Guy Harvey for an unforgettable look at his shark adventures from around the world. You'll meet Tiger Sharks, Great White Sharks (or are they?), Oceanic Whitetip Sharks, Mako Sharks - and more! You'll even meet Emma the Tiger Shark. Emma is a wild, 14-foot shark that is probably one of the most photographed marine animals in the world. Join Guy for this wild shark adventure!

Watch the full documentary here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07YLC9M86/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=guy+harvey+expeditions+sharks&qid=1596726521&s=instant-video&sr=1-1

#GuyHarvey #GHOF #SharkWeek #SaveOurSharks
Florida Institute of Oceanography
Guy Harvey
Join Guy Harvey for an unforgettable look at his shark adventures from around the world. You'll meet Tiger Sharks, Great White Sharks (or are they?), Oceanic Whitetip Sharks, Mako Sharks - and more! You'll even meet Emma the Tiger Shark. Emma is a wild, 14-foot shark that is probably one of the most photographed marine animals in the world. Join Guy for this wild shark adventure!

Watch the full documentary here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07YLC9M86/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=guy+harvey+expeditions+sharks&qid=1596726521&s=instant-video&sr=1-1

#GuyHarvey #GHOF #SharkWeek #SaveOurSharks
Florida Institute of Oceanography
Florida Institute of Oceanography
Where do sea turtle hatchlings go after incoming waves sweep their tiny bodies out to sea?
Sea turtles spend the first years of their lives traveling within the protection of floating Sargassum mats. This open ocean habitat is critical to their survival, providing shelter and small prey items.
Sargassum is a type of brown macroalgae (seaweed) that provides nursery habitat for over 120 species of fish and invertebrates.
FWC scientists conducted a study on occurrence of juvenile sea turtles and their Sargassum-dominated drift habitats, learn more: bit.ly/3iujqtI

A juvenile loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) found floating within a mat of pelagic Sargassum.
Florida Institute of Oceanography
Florida Institute of Oceanography
#TBT! Dr. Muller on-board the retired R/V Suncoaster
Florida Institute of Oceanography
Florida Institute of Oceanography
Professor Don Chambers, PhD, is studying some of the deepest parts of the ocean. From space. And he's using data that was once considered "noise" by fellow scientists. To an outsider, it might seem crazy. To Don, it's another puzzle ready to be cracked. #USF

https://bit.ly/33xDyXp
Florida Institute of Oceanography
Florida Institute of Oceanography
Fish ID Friday

We were recently sent an image from New Smyrna Beach of an “unusual fish” to identify.
Usually once a year we will get an occurrence of a strange, clear, orange barred fish from the east coast of Florida. Our scientist identified the fish as a rare deep-water, bottom-dwelling fish in the genus Ijimaia, known as a jellynose fish.

As to why this juvenile jellynose was found inshore, our scientist could only speculate that pelagic eggs, larvae, and juveniles may become caught up in nearshore currents, perhaps eddies spinning off the Gulf Stream, ending up in inlets or along beaches.

Need help identifying an unusual fish? Want to report a rare fish in Florida waters?
Saltwater: FishColl@MyFWC.com
Freshwater: ExoticFreshwaterFishID@MyFWC.com
Florida Institute of Oceanography
Florida Institute of Oceanography
“Regardless of the setting, a science camp experience should be focused on giving each girl a positive sense of self and science,” said Teresa Greely, PhD, College of #MarineScience Director of Education and Outreach. “I think now, more than ever, these girls are looking for a safe space to learn and build connections.” #USF

https://bit.ly/3fhGU2Q